LEARN

Philosophy

In this world where we know that money and consumption don’t buy happiness, we always start with the question: how can we use less things?

Still, we know for the world to function, the production, transport, transaction, and consumption of things is part of reality. In addition to thinking about how we reduce our impact, at Saahas Zero Waste, we also are ready to help manage waste and reduce the resources that are sitting and rotting in landfills.

Rules

Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, 2015.

The duties of waste generators have been outlined in MSW rules, which makes it mandatory for waste: -

  • to be segregated at source
  • to be managed locally without any open burning
  • final disposal to take place in a scientific landfill
Karnataka High Court
BBMP
  • Bulk generators include residential apartments (10 units and above), institutions, commercial, or a public entities which generate 10 kg and more wet waste per day.
  • Bulk generators are required to ensure proper and scientific segregation of wastes on their respective premises.
  • Waste must be segregated into Dry, Wet, Inert, Sanitary, and Garden waste.
  • Bulk generators shall not mix wet waste with any other types of waste.
  • No wastes shall be deposited on the streets, public spaces or vacant sites.

Bulk generators can engage the services of empanelled agencies (like Saahas Zero Waste) on mutually agreed upon terms.

SEGREGATION AT SOURCE

Waste segregation means keeping wet and dry wastes separately, so that dry waste can be recycled and wet waste can be composted.

This simple step is the first to enable a system that reduces waste that gets landfilled. Because there are numerous types of materials that we handle everday, segregation of your waste can be confusing. Please refer to this poster to to understand where to keep what waste.

Pic Courtesy : www.2bin1bag.in

  • Keep separate containers for dry and wet waste in the kitchen.
  • Keep two bags for dry waste collection- paper and plastic, for the rest of the household waste.
  • Send wet waste out of the home daily.
  • Store and send dry waste out of the home, once a week.
  • Keep a paper bag for throwing the sanitary waste.
e-Waste Policies

The following is a summary of rules published in the notification by Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, 2015

These rules apply to every manufacturer, producer, consumer, bulk consumer, collection centres, dealers, refurbishers, dismantler and recycler involved in manufacture, sale, transfer, purchase, collection, storage and processing of e-waste or electrical and electronic equipment (EEE).

The e-waste policy state about the following: -

  • Collection and channelization of e-waste
  • Implementation of Extended Producer Responsibility(EPR)

For further information on E-Waste rules, download the MOEF notification

Please read more about E-Waste here

CLIMATE CHANGE
  • Post-consumer waste is a small contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (<10%).
  • The largest source is landfill methane (CH4), followed by wastewater CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O).
  • Increased infrastructure for wastewater management in developing countries can provide multiple benefits for GHG mitigation.
  • Effective waste management practices concurrently reduce GHG emissions.
FAQ of Segregation

Q) What do you mean by waste segregation?

Waste segregation basically means keeping wet and dry wastes separately, so that dry waste can be recycled and wet waste can be composted

Q) Why should I do it?

So that it reduces waste that gets landfilled and reduces pollution to air and water. Segregation enables the different processes- composting, recycling, and incineration to be applied to different kinds of waste

Q) How do I practice waste management at home?

  • Keep separate containers for dry and wet waste in the kitchen.
  • Keep two bags for dry waste collection- paper and plastic, for the rest of the household waste.
  • Send wet waste out of the home daily.
  • Store and send dry waste out of the home, once a week.
  • Keep a paper bag for throwing the sanitary waste.

Q) What are hazardous wastes?

HHW or household hazardous wastes include three sub-categories – E-waste; toxic substances such as paints, cleaning agents, solvents, insecticides and their containers, other chemicals; and biomedical wastes like used syringes, expired medicines, thermometers, used cosmetics etc.

Understanding Segregation
  • Segregation at source is key to effective waste management.
  • Segregation results in waste being diverted from landfills.
Greenhouse gas emissions
  • Post-consumer waste is a small contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (<10%)
  • The largest source is landfill methane (CH4), followed by wastewater CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O)
  • Increased infrastructure for wastewater management in developing countries can provide multiple benefits for GHG mitigation
  • Effective waste management practices concurrently reduce GHG emissions